Translation Boulevard https://translationblvd.com Multi-Language Translation Services Tue, 25 Aug 2020 16:37:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1 https://translationblvd.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/cropped-TBLogoblue-32x32.png Translation Boulevard https://translationblvd.com 32 32 A translator’s perspective of the subtitling industry over the past 15 years https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/a-translators-perspective-of-the-subtitling-industry-over-the-past-15-years/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/a-translators-perspective-of-the-subtitling-industry-over-the-past-15-years/#respond Tue, 25 Aug 2020 06:13:14 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1818 It would be an overwhelming topic to discuss what the subtitling industry looks like now compared to 15 years ago.  However, reading a story about a subtitler who has been working in the industry for over 15 years may not be as daunting of a task. Think of it as a journey where much like translating […]

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It would be an overwhelming topic to discuss what the subtitling industry looks like now compared to 15 years ago.  However, reading a story about a subtitler who has been working in the industry for over 15 years may not be as daunting of a task. Think of it as a journey where much like translating subtitles for a movie, you may experience a wide range of emotions.  You could go from laughing one moment to crying the next. Of course, I cannot give you a full picture of what has been going in the subtitling industry, but I hope to give you a glimpse. Hopefully, it will provide some useful information to those translators and translation companies who want to jump into this industry.

In this article, I will briefly share my personal journey with subtitling and talk about the changes I witnessed over the years and what you should know if you want to come into this industry.

My personal journey with subtitling

I went to Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Southern California (USC) from 2002-2003. Around that time, a post-production company from Hollywood sent an email to the USC career office to recruit translators. I contacted them to take the test, and It turned out the project manager was Chinese and majored in English literature. She really liked my translation and commented that it stood out because I did not just translate word for word like she saw in many other test translations. I always tried to convey the meaning of the phrase within proper Chinese context and in a way that was natural to our language. This is a crucial skill in subtitle translation as a sentence, or several related sentences are often broken down into many different subtitles. Plus, the structure of an English sentence is often backward compared to Chinese. This project manager ended up leaving this company and joining another post-production company in Hollywood. She introduced me to many people and companies who worked in the Hollywood post-production circle. I was able to work on many TV and film projects from 2004-2006 because of these connections. Some of these projects were high profile, such as Fearless directed by Ronny Yu, starring Jet Li. I created all the subtitles for this movie. This story will connect one of my observations in the development of subtitle technology and the emergence of a cloud-based subtitle platform.

Copyright and confidentiality leads to the cloud-based platform

The movie Fearless was released in 2006, and I was working on it back and forth, making many revisions and edits for several months. It was common for me to work after hours, and one day the director of Fearless, Ronny Yu, wanted to meet with me to take a look at the subtitles before he released the final version. He had a tight schedule in the US, and the production company I worked for did not have any other employees available aside from me. When we met, I showed him all the subtitles I made. He was very happy with them but told me he would be in big trouble if I leaked the footage. What he said was true, I had reels of footage in DVD format. Whenever the post-production company made any edits, they would send me an updated copy. Of course, I kept everything confidential as a professional translator should. But you can see this type of transfer is very different from how we would do it now because it’s mainly cloud-based. Many streaming companies are transferring their footage and movies on cloud-based platforms, which has enhanced the confidentiality of their high profile footage and videos. However, cloud-based subtitling platforms will never replace the original way of doing things, partly because not every client can afford to build their own cloud-based subtitling platform. In many subtitling projects, the files are transferred via online sharing tools, such as Google Drive, Dropbox, and other third party transferring sites or software.  The recent advances in technology have made it easier to keep confidentiality in some ways. However, it is still up to the individual translator to abide by the laws and follow the ethical codes to ensure the client’s material is kept safe.

The evolution of technology

The software I used for working on films such as Fearless and other movies costs about ten thousand dollars for one translator’s license. It was costly. I remember the first time a Chinese woman introduced me to this software. She told me that this software was used widely among post-production companies in Hollywood and many TV stations in the US. She said if I could master the program, I would be able to get many jobs. It was certainly true. Having connections to many post-production companies, along with access to this software, allowed me to get many jobs. I did many HBO shows such as Everybody Loves Raymond and many other famous shows through a long term client.

Sean Song attending the first Netflix Linguist Mixer in 2017 at the Netflix Los Angeles office. (Photo by Sean Song)

In 2006, I decided to move to the East coast and leave Los Angeles. I went to say goodbye to my long time client, and the project manager told me if I could get this translator’s version of the software, I could still work for them remotely. But it was a hard decision for me as it cost more than ten-thousand dollars. I eventually got the software, and it paid for itself in the first year.

I was not aware of other free subtitling software available at that time, but it did become more available later on. A lot of free software has the same functions as this software, and the cloud technology that came down the road dealt the final blow to this software company. Eventually, the company that owned this software went bankrupt, and another company purchased the software. It is still used in the industry, but it does not hold the special status that it once did.

I jokingly call this “the democratization of subtitling technology.” This process of democratization forced some companies out of the market. It brought a new combination of free subtitling software, subscription-based subtitling software, and cloud-based subtitling platforms which are often free for translators who work for companies that have an online subtitling platform.

Technology can change, and subtitling software and companies can go out of business. But experienced subtitlers are still in demand. Experiencing the changes in the industry, as well as software, are still great assets for subtitlers or their companies.

The golden age before the 2008 economic crash and the rebound of subtitle industry

I would say the period before the economic crash in 2008 was one of the golden ages for subtitlers and the subtitling industry. I remember I was working on creating a phonetic version of Chinese scripts for a high profile Chinese movie, and the company paid several thousand dollars for it. It was well above my expectation, but they were very generous. But in 2008, there was a crash in this industry when the economic crash occurred. Even one of my long term clients, a famous subtitling and post-production company, went bankrupt. Many friends lost their jobs, and it was heartbreaking to see old friends suffer during that crisis. As a translator and subtitler, it was much easier to adjust and survive. This crash lasted for quite a while, and the rebound of the subtitling industry only happened when the top streaming companies such as Netflix and Amazon, as well as many others, jumped in and started to localize their movies and shows on their cloud-based subtitling platforms. I was fortunate enough to participate in some of these when they first began doing it. My experience in subtitling paid off well.

While many big subtitling companies tried to pay their translators fairly, in general, the price did not increase over the years, and it became even lower when compared to the prices for subtitling in the entertainment industry before 2008. It is true, especially for the entertainment sector of business.

Business subtitling vs. movie subtitling

Subtitling for the entertainment industry is one huge part of the business, but it includes other areas. Another essential area is business subtitling. When the per-minute price for subtitling in the entertainment industry is not high, many businesses are willing to pay much higher rates for their marketing videos. Because of this, there is an excellent market for business subtitling. If you want to come into the subtitling industry, you can never underestimate this aspect. I have worked on many business subtitling videos as well as projects for the entertainment sector.

Conclusion

What should you know if you want to come into this industry? Whether a subtitling company (competitive, technology, and business) or an individual subtitler, you need good software knowledge, you need to be or have good translators, and the experiences in subtitling or/ and management of its process will also be helpful.

Because of my extensive experience with subtitling, I have transferred this knowledge to my company Translation Boulevard to serve many clients with their subtitling needs. Please follow our blogs on Translation Boulevard’s website.  We will be sharing more experience about subtitling and software and the different processes of this service.  I hope this helps anyone interested in working in the subtitling industry.

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Easy WordPress site translation with WPML (WordPress Multilingual) https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/easy-wordpress-site-translation-with-wpml-wordpress-multilingual/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/easy-wordpress-site-translation-with-wpml-wordpress-multilingual/#respond Wed, 12 Aug 2020 06:40:45 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1758 Translation Boulevard partners with WPML to offer seamless translation of your WordPress website with the simple click of a button once the WPML plugin has been installed.   WHY USE TRANSLATION BOULEVARD & WPML Why Translation Boulevard? What differentiates us from other translation companies besides quality translation? Our company is operated according to Christian values […]

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Translation Boulevard partners with WPML to offer seamless translation of your WordPress website with the simple click of a button once the WPML plugin has been installed.

 

WHY USE TRANSLATION BOULEVARD & WPML

Why Translation Boulevard? What differentiates us from other translation companies besides quality translation? Our company is operated according to Christian values and our mission is not just to make money but also to transform society through our business. We are committed to helping those in need not only in our community but communities around the world as well. We care deeply about social justice and as a business, we take our social responsibilities seriously.

By having your WordPress website translated by Translation Boulevard via WPML you can be confident you’re receiving high quality translation by professional translators. We provide excellent translation while WPML makes the technical logistics simple. WPML is designed to handle any type of WordPress website including e-commerce sites, brochure sites, listing sites, and more.

 

GETTING STARTED

To activate Translation Boulevard as your selected translation service, you will need an authentication key (API Token). Please contact us through the form at the bottom of this page, and we will provide you with one.

Once you’re set up, we recommend making sure your site’s theme, plugins, and code are all multilingual-compatible. Contact us for a free site audit!

Finally, follow our getting started guide to start translating your site.

 

GET A QUOTE FOR YOUR NEXT PROJECT

We know it’s important to plan ahead, so to help you determine the cost of translation please use the website word count tool in WPML. Once you have the word count, use the form below to contact us for a quote.

If you have any questions or if you would like more information please contact us using the form at the bottom of the page. We look forward to translating your website!

Ready to Translate in WPML? Learn how to get your token today!

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Prevalent Translation Trends in 2020 https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/prevalent-translation-trends-in-2020/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/prevalent-translation-trends-in-2020/#respond Mon, 20 Jul 2020 14:59:32 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1452 Most internet users prefer to access content that can be translated into their native language. Aside from that, globalization is booming. As a result, there has been an increase in the integration of culture, companies and people, making translation even more critical. However, translation nowadays is more than just converting one language to another. In […]

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Most internet users prefer to access content that can be translated into their native language. Aside from that, globalization is booming. As a result, there has been an increase in the integration of culture, companies and people, making translation even more critical.

However, translation nowadays is more than just converting one language to another. In fact, contemporary trends have emerged to solve specifics of translation demand. Here are the most prevalent translation trends in 2020:

Trend #1: Mandarin Translation

The expanding economy of China has increased the demand for translation from and to Mandarin. Today, it is considered one of the fastest-growing economies globally, with an average GDP of 9.5%, just in 2019. China is also now considered to be the country with the most extensive rights.

If a company chooses not to deal with China due to a linguistic barrier, they will be left behind by their competitors, which is why Mandarin translation is important and popular. Having the right Mandarin translator and interpreter for doing business helps companies navigate the linguistic and cultural barriers and create better business relationships.

There are plenty of debates about whether Mandarin translation will remain a trend or not since there are visible signs of a volatile relationship developing between the US and China. However, the fact that China remains a major business hub despite US economic sanctions is proof that the Mandarin translation trend is here to stay. Furthermore, China does not only engage in business with the US but with other major economies also. Many persons are still trying to immigrate to other countries from China, and therefore, there are increasing demands for Chinese to English translation. Yet, there are some declines to the English to Chinese translation pair.

Trend #2: Video Translation

The most prevalent type of content found on the internet is video. In fact, it comprises ⅓ of all online content. It is foreseen that in 2021, the rate of video streaming and download per minute will be around 1 million. At the rate people are going, video consumption will increase exponentially, thereby making video translation a leading trend in the translation industry.

Video translations are typically more complex than plain text translation. This is because they require translators and also video and audio experts to sync the message with the scene within the video.

There are two major types of video translation: dubbing and subtitles. Subtitle video translation is the subscript that you find in the lower portion of the screen. It does not require a whole lot of effort, but does plenty in conveying the message of the video to the translated language.

However, few consumers like reading small text; hence, dubbing video translation has also become popular. Unlike subtitles, no text will be added to the video, but instead, there will be a voice-over from the original language to the translated language.

Both subtitles and dubbing are great for localizing content. As it is, videos are already an effective marketing tool. Making them more fitted to their audience will increase their effectiveness.

Video translation is essential because it has a significant impact on multiple industries. It will change how viewers expect and use videos from social media platforms. It will also enable video content to reach a larger audience, which can increase a company’s search engine rankings.

With the massive internet consumption of video content across the world, video translation will remain to be a trend in following years.

Trend #3: Artificial Intelligence Translation

Unlike Mandarin translation, artificial intelligence (AI) translation is a new emergence to the industry as only recent technologies have made this possible. Despite this, it is increasingly reshaping the landscape of the translation industry.

AI translation uses digital tools to translate spoken or written language. One of the most common examples of AI translators is Google Translate. It is estimated that in the next few years the use of AI translation for business and personal use will increase heavily.

However, there will be a long transition period before companies can fully utilize AI translation, since current AI’s are not fully developed. Most of them only translate on a word-to-word basis, which creates awkward translation. They are yet to carry the ability to translate the context of messages.

AI translation is now gaining a lot of attention, so research and further improvement are ongoing. When it is perfected, it will greatly impact the translation industry by making translation services faster and more accessible.

Trend #4: Content Strategy Localization

Nowadays, many more companies are recognizing the importance of engaging target audiences outside their native language. Due to this, content strategy localization is becoming a prevalent trend.

According to statistics, localized content increases engagement up to 6 times more than single language content. It also provides marketers with a 49% higher ROI, makes gathering quality leads easier and provides higher conversion.

Aside from that, plenty of marketing strategies are considered failures without localizing content since it provides the following benefits:

  • Added value against the competitors

Since there are still other businesses that do not invest in localized content, you already have an edge in international marketing, making your products and services more desirable.

  • The marketing message is more transparent

Consumers are always on the hunt for convenience, and typically, it is what wins their purchase the most. An easy-to-understand marketing message through localized content is thought to be more convenient by consumers.

  • Retention of audience interest

Most foreign consumers only purchase products from companies that offer localized content because it improves the trust between the customer and the brand.

Trend #5: Voice Search

In many mobile devices, voice search has been a popular feature. As a result, voice search translation demand has also increased. This is not a surprise, especially as Siri, Google’s Home Assistant and Alexa are becoming more popular.

From the perspective of the companies, investing in voice search translation is a promising idea because it allows them to tap into a larger demographic by breaking through language barriers. It also helps them rank better on search engines.

What does this mean for the translation industry?

As you may have noticed, the trends in translation reveal a high demand for this type of industry. Now, thanks to globalization and more frequent internet usage, this demand is not expected to slow down anytime soon.

Substantial changes are on their way to the translation industry, especially with the integration of AI translators. While the bugs of AI software are being sorted through, translation professionals can rest assured with their job security intact; their expertise is still in high demand.

Final Word

If you are a business owner or a professional in the translation industry, the trends list above can assess your current condition. Indeed, globalization is helping make this industry more essential for business, marketing and advertising purposes.

If you’re in need of any translation work, Translation Boulevard is your trusted friend. We are a professional translation service that offers translation in various languages.

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News Release: Sean Song’s article about Booking.com, published by Multilingual Magazine https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/news-release-sean-song-recently-published-his-interview-with-emmanuelle-dumas-the-language-solutions-manager-at-booking-com/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/news-release-sean-song-recently-published-his-interview-with-emmanuelle-dumas-the-language-solutions-manager-at-booking-com/#respond Mon, 20 Jul 2020 14:40:13 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1449 Sean Song recently published his interview with Emmanuelle Dumas, the Language Solutions Manager at Booking.com. Sean talks with Emmanuelle about the many remarkable things Booking.com has done to localize their content. This article was originally published in one of the most prominent magazines in the translation industry, Multilingual, on Jan/Feb 2020. Sean Song is the founder of […]

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Sean Song recently published his interview with Emmanuelle Dumas, the Language Solutions Manager at Booking.com. Sean talks with Emmanuelle about the many remarkable things Booking.com has done to localize their content.
This article was originally published in one of the most prominent magazines in the translation industry, Multilingual, on Jan/Feb 2020.

Sean Song is the founder of Translation Boulevard, a company that provides both translation and subtitling services. Previously, he worked as a journalist. He holds a master’s degree from Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism of the University of Southern California (USC), and the London School of Economics.

He loves writing articles about the translation industry and sharing his insight. Sean has also translated over 10 million words for Booking.com and he also has experience in translating and managing translation for the tourism industry.

Please check out his article published on our blogs.

Link: Click Here

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Sean Song’s article about Booking.com, published by Multilingual Magazine (Full Article) https://translationblvd.com/home-page/sean-songs-article-about-booking-com-published-by-multilingual-magazine-full-article/ https://translationblvd.com/home-page/sean-songs-article-about-booking-com-published-by-multilingual-magazine-full-article/#respond Mon, 20 Jul 2020 13:52:53 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1429 Sean Song is the founder of Translation Boulevard, a company that provides both translation and subtitling services. Previously, he worked as a journalist. He holds a master’s degree from Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism of the University of Southern California, and the London School of Economics. He loves authoring articles about the translation industry […]

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Sean Song is the founder of Translation Boulevard, a company that provides both translation and subtitling services. Previously, he worked as a journalist. He holds a master’s degree from Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism of the University of Southern California, and the London School of Economics.

He loves authoring articles about the translation industry and sharing his insight. In this interview with Emmanuelle Dumas, Language Solutions Manager at Booking.com, Sean talks about the many great things Booking.com has done to localize their content. Sean has translated over 10 million words for Booking.com and he also has experience in translating and managing translation for the tourism industry. He shares firsthand experiences and the lessons he learned while translating for the tourism industry.

This article was originally published in one of the most prominent magazines in the translation industry, Multilingual, on Jan/Feb 2020.

Booking.com:  Experiences and lessons learned in 22 years of localization

I started my career as a journalist, but subsequently became a translator.  More recently I started my own translation company as well.  In order to learn how to grow my new business, in 2018 I attended translation industry gatherings such as GALA’s annual convention and LocWorld’s conference on localization.  In one of the conversations there, I heard that the translation industry usually is under-reported on by the media at large.  One of reasons, I heard, is that the overall scale of that industry simply is not big enough to attract the media’s attention.

I agree with that view only to an extent.  As a journalist by trade, I know that good stories are everywhere.  You just need to dig them out.  A journalist cares most about finding a good story, regardless of which industry or sector of life it comes from.  Many times I have found good stories by talking with people sitting next to me or by visiting their homes after a news conference.  In other words, digging deeper will turn up good stories.

From where I live in Howard County, Maryland, I often travel Route 40 West from my home to the old house where I used to live in Catonsville.  At the intersection of Route 40 and I-695, the Baltimore Beltway, there long has stood a travel agency.  Even though I don’t remember of the name of that agency, I couldn’t help but notice the other day that it was finally closing down.  Feeling pity for the loss of that small business owner, I thought to myself, “what if he or she had adopted an online model earlier?”  Of course, I’ll never know the full story behind the closing of that business.

People may say that small local businesses go broke because of globalization, but that is not all that is going on.  Some big-name companies also have gone out of business because they failed to adjust to the digital age.

On the other hand, while localizing texts for the hotel industry since 2010, I have found that many small business owners, whether owners of small hotels or travel agencies, have achieved success by expanding their presence online.

This article is intended for readers who are interested in localization in the tourism industry or localization in general.  Learning from  successful localization efforts in the tourism industry could be beneficial, for both global companies and Mom and Pop stores as well.

Good stories are everywhere.  However, as a journalist, I have had to spend hours finding those stories online or though interpersonal communication.  Bridging that gap between a good story and the reader is the role of the journalist.

Following up on contacts I had made at LocWorld, I offered to dig out some of those stories to share with our readers.  I long had known of Booking.com as one of the pioneers in localization and thought that they were doing pretty well.  I speak from my own personal experience, as I have watched how my friends and colleagues in China used the Chinese version of Booking.com to search for local hotels.  Later, they saved themselves even more hassles when planning international trips, whether to London or Iceland.  So I reached out to Booking.com to see whether they would be willing to share their experiences with localization.  They generously agreed and arranged for me to talk with their Localization Head, Emmanuelle Dumas.

I asked Emmanuelle to share the history of their localization effort, their achievements, and any lessons they had learned.  She highlighted their “mixed model,” which combines in-house teams, freelance translators and writers, and translation companies.  I hope this will be helpful to other global companies that already are working on localization, as well as to others that are just contemplating starting down that path.  Small business owners also may benefit from this, as big companies like Booking.com also started small.  I hope you might agree that this effort, even in the oft-ignored translation industry, has turned up a good story.

To retain its authenticity, I have kept the following interview in its original Q&A format, although it has been edited for brevity and clarity.

Introducing Emmanuelle Dumas

Sean Song:  Could you just introduce a little bit about yourself for our readers?

Emmanuelle Dumas:  Sure.  My name is Emmanuelle Dumas.  I’m a French native speaker and by training a linguist and translator.  I have a master’s degree in Applied Linguistics and have worked all my career in the language and translation industry.  I started working on game localization and then moved on to work for some LSPs [language-service providers].

In September 2017 I joined Booking to manage the language services within Booking’s Content Agency.  The role is really about defining the language strategy and how best to support the business with innovative language solutions.

Localization at Booking.com

Sean Song:  Please tell us a bit about Booking.com and your localization history.  How did you start and come to excel as a global company?

Emmanuelle Dumas:  To give you a bit of history, Booking was one of the first online travel platforms.  It was founded here in the Netherlands in 1996. This certainly helped shape its future, because the Netherlands is a small country, and the Dutch people love to travel!  So the need to become international was there from the very early days.  It’s in our genes.

Our first office outside of the Netherlands was opened in Barcelona in 2002.  In 2005, Booking.com was acquired by Priceline, an American platform also in the hotel space.  Priceline’s acquisition of Booking.com gave it a foothold in Europe and, for Booking, provided us financial opportunities to expand further internationally.  From its beginning, Booking was very data-driven.  As we looked at adding languages, we always did it according to consumer needs, so languages were added based on consumer demand, at the beginning primarily to translate hotel descriptions.  And for a long time our approach to content was really transactional like that.  When it worked well, we continued, and we added languages on the basis of demand.

In 2010 we started adding language specialists to work alongside our UX [user-experience] copywriters, and supporting our cycle of A/B testing.  From then, it really became clear that the language specialists were supporting the user experience in multiple languages, so we have continued to scale up in that way.  Today we have 44 languages.  I believe that the last languages that we added were Icelandic and Argentinian Spanish.  Last year we added Georgian for our partners’ tools, but not yet for our customer content.

Now of course we constantly look at what markets we need to develop next and for me, in my role looking midterm, I consider what key markets the company is focusing on:  are there languages that we need to add, how do we need to upscale our internal teams, or what content will we be sending to our internal language specialists or external teams in the future?

So from the very beginning translation and localization have been at the core of what we do because Booking has been international from very early on.  Translation and localization boost our business because they allow us to be locally relevant.  With physical presence now in 70 countries and more than 200 offices, we are able to evaluate our local relevance every day through those local offices.

This global reach means that our local teams are constantly talking to our partners and also our guests, of course, and we have constant feedback on how locally relevant we are, what we could do better in-market.  Thus I would say that localization and translation are at the core of our business.

Booking.com:  Lessons Learned

Sean Song:  Would you have any experiences or lessons from your localization efforts from which others could learn?  I mean common pitfalls, or experiences to share with other global companies.

Emmanuelle Dumas:  We are very lucky to have a unique mixed model with internal language specialists being so involved in experimentation with localized copy, so we are able to tell very early on what works in certain markets and what doesn’t.  The local teams, working closely with our UX copywriters, are able to give feedback on copy that does not work well and provide an alternative better suited for use in their market, this can happen very fast.  Having worked in LSPs in the past, I would say that, if we relied exclusively on external resources, the feedback loop would be much slower.

When you can have internal localization experts and specialists constantly working with UX copy then it enables faster and higher-level localization and better adaptation to market.  My experience is that we are on target for each market faster because of our close coordination, and ensuring first time right voice of Booking.

Sean Song:  The CEO of a company, SmartLink, also made that same point, in a webinar on GALA I heard recently.  The buyer wants a direct relationship with the translator, not necessarily replacing the LSP but communicating better what they are trying to do.  Yours is a great suggestion, because you have direct relationships with the content writers, creators, translators, and your consumers.  A lot of companies give everything to the LSP, probably because they just want to have a good night’s sleep, but then they wake up to headaches because of mis-communication.  If you have only indirect communication with the content creators, they will not know the immediate response from the market.

Emmanuelle Dumas:  That’s exactly right.  I think probably you can achieve it with an LSP, but they probably need longer agreements, more in-depth communication, longer feedback loops to achieve the results that we achieve when our product teams and language specialist teams are basically part of one team within Booking.  The other advantage is of course that our internal language specialists are so passionate about the product, about our company, about the brand, and about what they are translating.  There is a level of involvement and engagement that you get from internal language teams that you cannot get from an external provider.

Sean Song:  Is the cost higher to hire an LSP or to maintain an internal team?

Emmanuelle Dumas:  Well, I think this is very difficult to compare and evaluate because it depends very much on what you include in the costs of localisation. In my experience most companies using LSPs need to involve teams in Product and Marketing to support with guidelines, terminology validation, review, feedback, final content approval… These are a lot of hidden costs, and for us, a model that would simply not be efficient or scalable enough.

We prefer to look at the value that having our internal teams generate, the edge it gives us to enable multilingual and multi-market copy experimentation so fast, and similarly, to ensure high-quality locally-relevant branded messaging for our marketing campaigns.

Sean Song:  I agree.  A lot of buyers just want the certainty of saving money.  You point out that it is not only hard to compare whether they are saving money but the quality of the work differs, too.

Speed, Quality, Feedback

Emmanuelle Dumas:  Nowadays, it seems that time to market is key. We are working with internal stakeholders and also sister companies who are most concerned with both a short time to market and high quality.

In general, our model provides the best basis for fast turn-around and faster change.  If we need to take a different approach, we can do it in less time and more flexibility with an internal team.

Sean Song:  What feedback do you get, from either hotel clients or other consumers?  Please cite one or two examples.

Emmanuelle Dumas: We collect user feedback in a number of ways to have different touch-points on quality.  Of course we have stakeholder surveys, for satisfaction and quality.  Also, after every major launch or major project with our internal stakeholders, we use feedback loops to find out how our general stakeholders evaluate our quality.  Then internal Booking employees form another layer of feedback, since all of us are also Booking.com users and we have a culture of feedback!  We have a system in place internally whereby everybody can give feedback on the quality.

I’m French, so when I use Booking.com in my language, if I see something that I find a little bit strange, I can directly provide my comments through our feedback system.

Finally, we also conduct end-user surveys for customers and partners, to find out what the users think of the language on Booking.com:  what they think of the forms of address or our communication in general.  We try to measure quality from all of the possible angles.

LSPs vs Freelancers

Sean Song:  Other companies hoping to globalize as Booking.com has done may be just starting their localization process now, so they want to hear what’s best for them: to hire an LSP such as you worked for, or to manage an internal linguist team. What’s your view as to what’s the best for a global company?

Emmanuelle Dumas: There are advantages to every model. Probably the answer is somewhere in the mixed approach. For us at Booking, I have to say that, even though I came from a background of having worked with many LSPs, when I joined Booking and its internal Content Agency team, I was amazed by all the advantages that it brings, and how quickly and efficiently we can support the business.  Essentially, our platform is really our formula for localizing content and constantly optimizing.  We run a lot of A/B experiments to determine best content solution.

Sean Song:  Excuse me, what are “AB experiments”?  

Emmanuelle Dumas:  “A/B experimentation” means basically that we are testing different variants of different elements on a page, for example how a call to action is worded or how certain information is displayed, to see which performs better with our users.  With this model, it’s very useful for us to have internal language specialists working so closely with our product teams and our copywriters.  It enables us to get content ready and localized fast.

Sean Song:  This is probably one of the gold nuggets Booking.com has found, because a lot of people are considering whether they should have an internal team or just hire an LSP.

Emmanuelle Dumas:  Our model is mixed, of course.  Our internal teams work on a lot of our most critical, branded, content, and they are at the core of our localization process, but, like other large companies, we also use freelancers and LSPs for specialized or very scaled content.

Machine Translation, Languages, Quality

Sean Song:  I see.  But what about machine translation?

Emmanuelle Dumas:   I knew that you would ask about MT.  We now have live machine translation in 12 languages, for property descriptions, for example.  When our MT team was built, roughly two years ago, they started working on neural machine translation.  Because at Booking we had so much data on property description that we had been translating for years with freelancers, we were able very quickly to build neural machine models to very, very high quality.  Today, after just two years Machine Translation team have put 12 languages in production.

Sean Song:  How many languages are you currently translating into?

Emmanuelle Dumas:  Currently we are translating in 44 languages.

Sean Song:  Wow, 44 languages!  I’m very impressed.  How do you control the quality of managing those 44 languages?  

Emmanuelle Dumas:  As I mentioned earlier, ours is a mixed model with internal and external teams and translating very different content types. So we have a created a quality framework that actually supports all of our needs, including content and services.  The quality framework looks at quality, from a purely linguistic point of view but also from our stakeholders’ feedback, as to the level of quality that they need for the product.  In addition, we also look at the end-users’ perception of the quality of language on Booking.com.  For example, we run surveys to find what our users think about the language, the tone, and how we address the users, their experience when they use Booking.com in terms of pure language.

We also can do some very targeted quality research, for example, we can pretest on a specific challenge we have with a language or product.

Strategy for the future

Sean Song:  As my last question, do you have a vision for the future or a strategy for the next five years and beyond?  I wonder especially about machine translation, which you mentioned:  a lot of things are going on there in the world of localization.

Emmanuelle Dumas:  Well, our machine translation team certainly does and I think they basically are looking at training their model for more languages.  That is one of the things they are working on, and also more use cases for machine translation.  Now we are using MT only for our property descriptions and user reviews, but not in many languages.  Obviously, we are trying to deploy MT on more use cases, and more languages.

On my side, I’m also concerned midterm with what should be the next languages that we need to focus on,  the markets our business is focussing on, whether we will need to add new languages, and how are we going to go about it.

Now that Booking.com has grown to be a platform where people come to book much more than just their accommodation, we have many products and a lot of different types of content.  Our language teams strength is to be very integrated with the business and to be part of the Global Content Agency within Booking.com.  We are looking at basically collaborating with the business on more of their content, what the next leads will be, and how we can support them.  For instance, last year we localized the Booking Assistant chat product into several priority languages to support our customer service, providing faster solutions to Booking.com users.

Sean Song:  This has been so helpful.  Thank you very much.

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The Effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on translation in Canada https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/the-effects-of-the-covid-19-pandemic-on-translation-in-canada/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/the-effects-of-the-covid-19-pandemic-on-translation-in-canada/#respond Thu, 09 Jul 2020 14:44:00 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1286 Information is essential to life. Road signs, billboards, signposts, news updates, and several other means are used to disseminate life-saving information in recent times. The century has seen the birth of perilous times that have claimed the lives of millions. The COVID -19 outbreak is one such disaster, and to battle it, every individual needs […]

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Information is essential to life. Road signs, billboards, signposts, news updates, and several other means are used to disseminate life-saving information in recent times. The century has seen the birth of perilous times that have claimed the lives of millions. The COVID -19 outbreak is one such disaster, and to battle it, every individual needs accurate information to preserve their lives. Especially poor communities with little or no access to information. While adequate information is available in some languages, immigrants from foreign lands might find it difficult to benefit. Some languages do not even have information available in them. Translation is key to communicating locally in the global world. It is a core tool that ensures as many people as possible have access to current and accurate information.    

In comparison to many countries hit by the COVID-19 pandemic, the risk of the virus is considered high across Canada when compared to other regions across the globe.  Of course, the government under the umbrella of the public health agency of Canada continues working hand in glove with local communities,  provinces, and international bodies to effectively curb the spread and contain the virus. About 116,000 jobs have been created coupled with loans and salary subsidy schemes to revitalize the economy.  While both big and small businesses are affected, many have improvised but some are still struggling to get back on their feet. Small businesses that require a daily influx of consumers to thrive, have experienced a sharp drop in productivity in the last few months.

However, there are jobs available because of the increased demand in the medical field, such as the translation of medical information, delivery services, and pharmaceuticals.  There are also jobs created by the need for additional safety measures in everyday business.  A practical example is a Toronto based butcher who has had to create jobs for roles such as crowd control, cleaning and sanitizing, and additional staff to fill in vacanciesbecause of possible sickness or hospitalization of employees. The tactics employed by this owner are similar to what many industries do to generate output to meet demands. This also helps workers maintain jobs or provides temporary replacements until its safe to operate at full capacity.

The translation industry has suffered a decline in salesmuch like many other industries. Locational jobs are out of the picture, but the ability of the industry to function remotely has proved beneficial. However, a drastic shift in translation content is occuring. Especially for businesses, the tone and message are tailored to address the current situation. Continue reading to see how  translators around Canada have adapted to better serve multilingual patrons remotelyin an effort to mitigate the spread of COVID-19.

“New avenues have cropped up. Our translation team now works remotely offering telephone and online services. Challenges are present, such as network interruption which makes it difficult to carry out an excellent job at times. But in the comfort of our homes, we’ve attended to businesses that are exploring digital options to connect with existing customers and grow a new base. Additionally, quite a number of medical medical-related jobs are increasingly becoming the norm and available task”-   Teresa.

The comment of Teresa gives insight into how translation companies in Canada are adapting to changes to ensure continued productivity. Additionally, a translator by the name Onan shares this- ” I still have plenty of tasks to work on, like marketing copy, email, website contents, and other e-commerce related translation jobs. While the conventional content translation remains, attention has shifted to new company policies in the heat of the moment- talk of pausing some services, subscription cancellations, and new avenues of providing customers with good services in the meantime”.

As the reports from Canada reflect the current situation of the translation industry, something similar is happening around the world. An Argentina based translator, Gabriela, says “Although translating for the local client is on hold at the moment, I have been kept busy by international clients together with medical translation and customer care services translation”

The translation industry has done relatively well, considering the current situation. The  WORLD Health Organization (WHO) has not only declared a pandemic but an infodemic as well. Inaccurate information has flooded the Internet and it gets even worse when translated to other languages. COVID-19 is no joke, over 400,000 deaths have been recorded so far and the number is still steadily rising. This is a clear indication that translations services are needed to save lives.

Translators can work and handle many projects remotely. Here are a couple of suggestions that translators can use to keep working despite the pandemic.

• Utilizing modern video-enabled communicating platforms such as Zoom, Skype, and Duo. These tools will substitute for person to person translations and interactions during the pandemic period.

• Get familiar with medical content to aid with accuracy and simplicity in translation. The more translators study medically related topics, the better they get at translating them. Additionally, it provides more job opportunities since the bulk of available translation jobs relates to the current event.

Translation Boulevard is functioning remotely to work Internationally. We have worked with numerous companies to translate their adjustment policies for employees and customers in different countries and languages. In Canada, where loan opportunities provided by the government are available to boost businesses, we have translated many foreign documents for applicants of Bank Loans and others.  

With over 15 years of experience in the translation industry, Translation Boulevard keeps the quality of translation intact by maintaining accuracy and clarity. We are a team of professionals who are committed to completing projects efficiently, respectably while focusingon building trust with our customers.

We help you reach your audience using our experienced ranslators. We assist you in speaking to your customers and employees through videos with excellent subtitling. We ensure that our text translations are accurate to keep the intended meanings intact.

Our services are fast and reliable. Over the years, we’ve worked with hundreds of clients who have not only complemented but also recommended us. We are always available to respond to your inquiries. Visit Translation Boulevard to get a quote on your project and enjoy our services firsthand.

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9 Filipino Words that Don’t Have a Direct English Translation https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/9-filipino-words-that-dont-have-a-direct-english-translation/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/9-filipino-words-that-dont-have-a-direct-english-translation/#respond Tue, 07 Jul 2020 17:50:29 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=1228 The Filipino language is filled with tons of different words, with Tagalog being hailed as the official language of the Philippines. Aside from Tagalog, there are also countless dialects spoken throughout the various parts of the country. With such a vast number of words, it’s not surprising that some Filipino words don’t have an English […]

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The Filipino language is filled with tons of different words, with Tagalog being hailed as the official language of the Philippines. Aside from Tagalog, there are also countless dialects spoken throughout the various parts of the country.

With such a vast number of words, it’s not surprising that some Filipino words don’t have an English counterpart. Many words do not have any direct English translation. If you’re interested in finding out why, take a look at these examples:

1. Kilig

Perhaps one of the most popular untranslatable word in the Filipino language is the word “kilig.” Even though most Filipinos would mix it with several English words to make the expression “kilig to the bones,” the word itself is widely accepted as standalone.

In English, it could mean trembling, though even that translation is not close. After all, “kilig” specifically refers to the excitement and feeling you get when you have the proverbial “butterflies in your stomach,” like when you see your crush or when your partner surprises you with a gift. It can also apply to certain situations, like watching a romantic movie, where viewers witness something exciting like the main stars holding hands or even kissing.

2. Gigil

The word “gigil” could be described as an intense urge to pinch or squeeze someone due to their cuteness. It can also be used to describe the urge to clobber or punch someone just because of how annoying they are. It’s basically a dual-purpose word designed for two different situations.

3. Basta

“Basta” is a word that can be synonymous with the word enough. In fact, it originated from the Spanish expression ¡basta ya! which translates to English as “enough already.” However, the Filipino version has quite a different meaning.

The word is often used in a conversation or argument between people who don’t have anything left to add to their point or simply don’t feel like expounding on their thoughts. Therefore, they just resort to adding the word “basta” in their argument.

Also, when Filipinos say the word “basta,” it’s often definitive, meaning that everything that’s been said before is final and true. It is often denoted as something that can’t be argued. For example, when Filipino children ask their mother why they should do what she told them, to which she replies “basta,” then that would mean they have to obey without question.

4. Lihi

The word “lihi” can be associated with the term “pregnancy sickness.” However, as far as Filipinos are concerned, there’s a deeper meaning behind the word. The word is often associated with a pregnant woman’s irrational craving for something, and it’s usually something that occurs during her first trimester. Also, during this period, she’ll often go into mood swings and will crave various foods, even during the wee hours of the night.

In some cases, she may end up taking a liking to something to which Filipinos would believe will affect the appearance of her unborn child. For example, if a child resembles a frog when born, that’s because the mother enjoys looking at frogs during her pregnancy. In a sense, you can say that the child was “pinaglihi” to frogs. It’s bizarre, yes; but it’s actually something that’s part of the Filipino culture.

5. Umay

If you’ve ever used the phrase “I just can’t get enough,” then the exact opposite of that phrase would be the word “umay.” In the Filipino language, “umay” is a feeling that’s associated with having too much of the same food or doing the same work over and over again.

In the Philippines, where festivals are commonplace and tons of food is prepared for each celebration, it would be quite easy to experience this particular feeling. For example, if you ate too much lechon (roasted pig) when attending a festival, then you’d come to the point where you’d experience the feeling of “umay” or “nakakaumay.”

Of course, as mentioned earlier, the word isn’t just limited to food. It can also be used for a repetitive task you keep on doing over and over again. It could also be used when seeing the face of a co-worker you don’t like every single time you visit the office cafeteria. That, in essence, is called “umay.”

6. Pasalubong

“Pasalubong” is basically a gift, but in context, it’s something you give to someone who’s expecting you, and vice-versa. It could be in the form of food, a gadget, or other small items. In the Filipino culture, if you’re working overseas and come home after a long time, then your relatives and friends would often expect you to give them a “pasalubong.”

7. Diskarte

The word “diskarte” is something you’d associated with being “street-smart” considering that it’s not normally taught in school. In English, the closest word would be “resourcefulness” or “ingenuity.” However, there’s also a negative connotation for the word “diskarte” as it could sometimes involve doing something mischievous, like a bit of theft or manipulation, to gain the upper hand.

8. Tampo

If you’ve felt disappointed with someone for something they’ve done, then that could be a feeling that’s known in the Filipino language as “tampo.” In most cases, it’s a feeling that’s combined with silence and avoidance of someone, though it’s not quite along the lines of anger or sadness.

9. Bangungot

The word “bangugot” is often referred to by people as having a nightmare, except for one major difference. When you experience a nightmare, that means you have a really bad dream that may cause you to wake up in the middle of your sleep. On the other hand, “bangungot” will prevent you from waking up, ever, thus causing you to die in your sleep.

Filipinos believe that “bangungot” can be prevented by not sleeping in a full stomach. Meanwhile, the Filipino folklore associates it with a demonic creature known as batibat who will sit in your face as you sleep, thus causing you to suffocate to death.

Wrapping It Up

There you have it – some of the common Filipino words that don’t have direct English translations. Of course, the list goes on considering the Filipinos’ quirkiness and their tendency to create their own words for just about everything.

If you’re interested in learning more about the fun and exciting Filipino language, or have a document you want translated into Filipino then Translation Boulevard is your trusted friend. It’s a professional translation service that offers translation to various languages, including Filipino, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, French, African, and more.

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Translation Boulevard shows its support for New York medical professionals during COVID-19 https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/translation-boulevard-shows-its-support-for-new-york-medical-professionals-during-covid-19/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/translation-boulevard-shows-its-support-for-new-york-medical-professionals-during-covid-19/#respond Sat, 04 Jul 2020 15:29:11 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=863 The shortage of protective gear in hospitals in New York caused many medical professionals to go through a difficult time when COVID-19 hit New York earlier this year. According to an article in the New York Times by Andrew Jacobs, Matt Richtel, and Mike Baker, one hospital was even considering shutting down because of the […]

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The shortage of protective gear in hospitals in New York caused many medical professionals to go through a difficult time when COVID-19 hit New York earlier this year. According to an article in the New York Times by Andrew Jacobs, Matt Richtel, and Mike Baker, one hospital was even considering shutting down because of the lack of face masks.   Another article by CBS News titled “Sick doctors, nurses and not enough equipment: NYC health care workers on the fight against the coronavirus” reveals the difficult situation for medical workers in New York.

Many Chinese American medical workers in the New York area faced the same issue. Because of this, they began to share their struggles through WeChat, a social media platform used among many Chinese people in the US. In a post by the Association of Chinese American Physicians (ACAP) in the New York area, they asked the Chinese community in the US to support their effort to donate medical supplies to many hospitals in the New York area.

Translation Boulevard is deeply committed to helping surrounding communities, and we participated in this drive. Sean Song, CEO of Translation Boulevard and President of the Non-profit organization Jairus Bible World, led these two organizations to raise funds to donate to this cause. Translation Boulevard donated $635 to make the total donation about $3000 when combined with the donation from Jairus Bible World.

Ruliang Xu, MD, President of the Association of Chinese American Physicians (ACAP) said in a letter to Translation Boulevard,

“Thank you for your generous donation to the Association of Chinese American Physicians (ACAP)’s COVID-19 Response Efforts to fight Coronavirus outbreak. Your donation will help us to purchase necessary medical supplies for hospitals and provide much needed protection for healthcare professionals and patients. We are truly grateful for your timely and kindhearted donation.”

According to a report released by ACAP on March 31, 2020, they had raised 13,1670.32 dollars by that date, and they had donated various medical supplies to The Brooklyn Hospital Center, Jamaica Hospital Medical Center, New York-Presbyterian Queens, Flushing Hospital Hospital Medical Center, and many other hospitals.

Sean Song states he believes the social responsibility of a business is vital to society. He says,  “Translation Boulevard is still a small business, so what we can do is limited. But we are committed to doing more if our business grows.” It is a difficult time for business owners during this Covid-19 pandemic, but he believes there will be a strong rebound in the economy after this. He believes there is hope for small and minority business owners and wants to encourage others to stay strong during these difficult times.

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Amazing Facts About the French Language https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/amazing-facts-about-the-french-language/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/amazing-facts-about-the-french-language/#respond Fri, 19 Jun 2020 02:20:09 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=822 There are so many amazing and interesting facts about the French language. You'll love learning how it impacts people, cuisine, literature, and other intriguing things as you read further.

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“Bonjour mon Voisin” – this simple greeting could be all you need to bring out the smile on your neighbor’s face if you have just started learning or perhaps moved to a French-speaking community. Or you could be an advanced speaker of the language using its many exciting features and idioms as you go through daily activities. Whichever is the case, there are so many amazing and interesting facts about the French language. You’ll love learning how it impacts people, cuisine, literature, and other intriguing things as you read further.

One amazing fact you should know about this beautiful language is the uniqueness of its origin. The French language originates from an ancient form of Latin known today as Vulgar Latin. While it is true that many languages in today’s world have emerged from Latin, just a few of these languages come from this unique form of Latin.

 Also, if you are wondering if it’s worth the effort to learn the French language, or perhaps, you are a fluent speaker, and you do not know where the language might come in handy. Well, here is something you should know; French is spoken in every continent on earth. Officially, it is spoken in 29 different countries around the world. If you ever want to view the beautiful gorillas at Senkwekwe, the Republic of Congo, or wish to explore the booming business world of Antwerp in Belgium or go on a lovely vacation at the serene sights of Canada, be sure to take your French along with you.

Additionally, based on a study, one language goes into extinction every 14 days. But this is the exact opposite of the French language. It continues to extend worldwide, and it’s the official language in many developing countries. Do you know that the language has over 300 million speakers? Wow, right? It is also projected to reach a range of 750 million speakers by 2050. This ever-growing status of the language is impressive.

Also, If you live in a community where French is not commonly spoken, there is a chance that at least one of your friends or relatives is learning the French language. This is because French can boast of up to 3 million teachers around the world. As such, its influence continues to grow, and it continues to gain more students around the world. And if you ask your friends what they enjoy from learning the language, they would probably give you the same answer my friends gave me.” It is easy to learn and fun to use”. Why is that? Pay attention to the comment below;

“It was easy for me to understand French during my learning days. Rarely would there be a sentence that does not have at least one word that I am familiar with.” That was the sentiment of a friend who was a native English speaker. Now, is this because French has many English words? No, quite the opposite. Many English words today are actually from French. In fact, you are sure to find at least one word originally from French for every five English words you come across. And quite a number of them are frequently used in everyday English. You probably know that terms like “déjà vu” and “café” are of French origin. What about words like “restaurant and “war,” did you know they are French words?

Now, while many languages such as English boast of their complex and complicated tongue twisters, the French language possesses its version of tongue twisters. Still, the kicker is the fact that they are very common words in the French vocabulary. They are fun to pronounce, and it helps you look classy in your usage of the language. And if you are learning French, you would discover many other tongue-twisting sentences, and in time, you would be able to form your own.

What is more, its worldwide reach and influence on other languages is not the only aspect of the language that continues to grow. The French language itself continues to grow at a fantastic rate. Thousands of words are added each year to the language, and it currently has about a million words. As more words are added, due to its growing influence, more of these words are being adopted into other languages. When last did you “update” your French? It might be time to discover new words and add them to your vocabulary. That will help you stay sophisticated.

Furthermore, are you perhaps the type that loves novels, poems, and other literary works? Here is one for you; many popular books that have been translated into many languages today were initially written in French. You must have heard of the book “Cinderella,” yes, the same one. Amazingly, it was initially written in French with the title “Cendrillon.” Another famous example is “La Belle au Bois dormant (The Sleeping Beauty).” And due to its ancient influence on the literature works around the world, more and more French writers continue to emerge.

What’s more exciting? Many French writers that exist today were not initially French speakers; they learned the language because it influenced literature. So when you pick up your favorite book and enjoy it, there is a possibility it was originally written in French.

Keep in mind that every culture around the world has developed unique ways and practices they employ while cooking their foods. There is a wide range of diversity when comparing foods from different cultures, such as how they are prepared, what they are called, and many other things. But if you check again, you will find something familiar in all these foods. The French language! Whether it is how the food is being prepared, or perhaps the instruments employed in cooking, you are sure to find a French word somewhere in there. Words like salad, beef, and stew, continue to dominate the culinary register of many cultures around the world.

Whenever someone around you speaks French, the country France easily comes to mind. Perhaps because France is one of the most famous French-speaking countries in the world, or because, Paris, the capital of France, is the most populated, French-speaking city in the world. This makes it quite easy to assume that the French language gained its usage originally from France. Well, guess what? French did not originate in France. It was initially spoken in parts of Germany and Holland. So what was the primary language in France at first? You guessed right; it was Latin.

Thank you for taking the time to enjoy these amazing facts. Continue to enjoy the French language, it’s a beautiful melodious tune, and if you’re just learning the language, have fun while at it—Au revoir.

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WPML Integration is Here! https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/wpml-integration-is-here/ https://translationblvd.com/uncategorized/wpml-integration-is-here/#respond Mon, 17 Jun 2019 12:44:56 +0000 https://translationblvd.com/?p=741 Translation Boulevard Launches WordPress Integration Solution Translation Boulevard is working with WPML to provide multi-language translation services to WordPress websites. WPML enables WordPress websites to become multilingual, making it easy to translate WordPress pages, posts, tags, categories and themes. WPML was developed by OnTheGoSystems and is one of the best WordPress plugins to enable WordPress […]

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Translation Boulevard Launches WordPress Integration Solution

Translation Boulevard is working with WPML to provide multi-language translation services to WordPress websites. WPML enables WordPress websites to become multilingual, making it easy to translate WordPress pages, posts, tags, categories and themes. WPML was developed by OnTheGoSystems and is one of the best WordPress plugins to enable WordPress websites to be translated into multiple languages. WPML has customized a solution for Translation Boulevard that allows you to download WPML and intall it on your websites. Once WPML is installed on your website, you can send content directly from your WordPress website to our translation portal. Once the translation is completed, it will be sent back to your WordPress platform.

Over 60% of CMS users use the WordPress platform and it powers 30% of all websites according to W3Techs, a company that tracks the usage of different web technologies. WPML now powers nearly half of a million WordPress websites.

About Translation boulevard

At Translation Boulevard we specialize in offering translation services in subjects such as media, marketing, law, medicine, finance and general documents. We also provide website localization, subtitling, transcription, transcreation, voice over and DTP services. We can work with over 50 major languages pairs.

Our company is operated according to Christian values and our mission is not just to make money but to make a positive impact on society through our business practices. We are committed to helping those in need in our community and communities around the world. We care deeply about social justice and we are willing to take our social responsibilities seriously as a business. Please visit our website for more information and learn how you can be a participant as well by working with us.  TRANSLATION BOULEVARD

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